Topeak Fuel Tank Review

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In a land of seemingly endless options of independent makers and custom bag companies, why would anyone want or need a stock production bag?

I’m here to dive into the world of production cycling bags including top tube bags, seat bags, and handlebar bags. Starting with one of my all-time favorites, Topeak’s Fuel Tank (large).

Topeak has been in the cycling game for nearly 30 years. They’ve been known for their iconic Joe Blow series pumps, but have since branched out to everything from bike repair tools to bags to cycling computers, saddles, repair stands, racks, lights, and more.

I had to do some background research Topeak as it’s not apparent where they are based. A little search engine sleuthing brought me to a profile on Bicycle Retailer’s website stating that Topeak is a Taiwanese based company.

It makes sense. Taiwan is the world’s hub of cycling manufacturing. State of the art facilities with both factories and design firms are sprinkled throughout the country. If you’ve ever purchased a bike or cycling product, it was likely either manufactured or designed in Taiwan.

Based off the design and aesthetics, part of me assumed Topeak was German based. Maybe it’s the fact that Topeak and Ergon (saddle & grip company) have been so closely linked as they have co-sponsored professional cycling teams.

Anyway, that’s not what I’m here to talk about. I’m here because every time I post a photos of one of my bikes with the Fuel Tank I’m asked by someone what type of bag it is.

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The Fuel Tank is a masterfully designed bag. The outside texture is a rubberized finish with a carbon like pattern. You can see in the above photo the texture and stitching is high quality.

The bag is made in two size options. I opted for the large as it can fit even the largest of phones with loads of room to spare. The size specs are below courtesy of Topeak’s website:

Capacity- 45 cubic Inches
Size- 9.4″x4.3″x2.5″
Weight- 5.28oz

Topeak states that the bag is made out of a 420 denier nylon and PVC combination.

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While the outside of the bag is a sleek matte black, the inside is Topeak’s signature yellow. I’m always a fan of bags that have bright interiors so you can actually see what’s inside. The bag has an included padded hook and loop divider. You can see on the left side of the bag I utilized that to create a little holder for my lip balm. This makes it easy to find and be able to grab it one handed while cruising along while riding.

The right hand side of the bag has a large mesh pocket, Topeak suggests a battery bank or something similar can be placed here on their website. All of my battery banks are too large to fit in there, but I stash things like my minimalist wallet or nutrition gels in there. It also works well for stashing a mask since we are in COVID19 times as I write this.

To provide a bit of the scope of size for this bag I can comfortably fit the following:

iPhone 8 with case
Rav Power 20k milliamp battery bank
usb micro cord
Apple lightening cord
ear buds
several hydration mixes (I usually carry either a tube of Nuun or 3-4 powder packets)
2 nutrition bars (RX Bars or Clif/Luna)
nutrition bloks
a portable peanut butter packet (RX nut butter or Justins)
a packet of chamois cream (Hoo Ha Ride Glide)
minimalist wallet
cloth mask
portable hand sanitizer
+ more room to spare

You can fit a TON in this bag and then some. It’s one of the largest top tube bags I’ve seen on the market without being a custom product. P1040824P1040825
One of my favorite features of the Fuel Tank is the fact that you can pass a charging cable through the bag on the left hand side. This means that if you use a GPS, smartphone, or need to juice a light on the go you have the option to run a cable up to that devise while your battery bank stays safely tucked inside the bag.

I’ve only had to use this feature once on a bike camping overnight as I forgot to charge my cycling computer before I left home and it was awesome to be able to have that option without having to leave the zipper of the bag slightly open at the top.

The cable pass-thru placement allows you to tuck the cable out of the way and not jiggle around on the bag.
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Another feature I love about this bag is it’s essentially waterproof. The rubberized material around the entire bag paired with the thickly padded, structure, and the waterproof zipper with a zipper garage ensures your electronics and other sundries stay dry.

I can attest to this as I got absolutely drenched last summer on my bike camping outing with Bell Joy Ride Madison. You can read my write up or watch my vlog about the trip in earlier posts on the blog.
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As far as attaching the bag to a bike. I’ve been able to successfully attach it to every bike in my stable, including my large carbon tubed Topstone Carbon, which is notoriously difficult to put a strap style bag on- hence their top tubes have drilled attachment points for direct mount bag systems.

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There’s a small bit of wear on the bottom of the bag, but it’s still in wonderful condition!

The retail on the Topeak Fuel Tank Large is around $50 depending on where you purchase it. I’m sure you can find some sale prices online, but always recommend checking with your LOCAL BIKE SHOP to support them.

I purchased this item with my own money via my bike shop employer. I was not asked by them or Topeak to write this review and don’t receive any monetary compensation from writing said review.

Honestly, this is one of the highest quality production bags I’ve owned and used during my many years as a cyclist. I’ve had the bag for going on two years now and it has yet to fail me or let me down.

I’m always impressed by the amount of items you can carry in the bag and have never had one returned for any reason at my place of work upon recommending the bag to customers.

Topeak has a home-run on their hands with the Fuel Tank and hope they continue to keep making the product for years to come!

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Topeak Fuel Tank on the Bike Packing Rig

That’s all for this write up. Be on the lookout for write-ups on some of Blackburn’s production bags! I’ve also been plugging away at a video review for my Cannondale Topstone Carbon RX, but have had some issues with audio. Stay tuned as I’ll likely release a write up prior to the video.

What’s In Your Seat Bag?- 1st Edition

seatbagEvery cyclist should have some sort of emergency kit or way of fixing a flat when out on a ride. We always preach that even if you don’t know how to fix your own flat, there’s someone out there who does. Ride prepared!

These are a few items we choose to carry on our bikes at all times, no matter where we’re headed.

From left to right:

-Glueless tube patches
These are an easy, quick fix should you pinch flat or run over something sharp. It’s also a good idea to carry a wet wipe or hand sanitizer to clean off the area you plan on sticking the patch to.

-Crank brothers speedier lever
Out off all the tires levers we’ve tried (up to this point) this is one of the easiest to use. All you need is one vs. the standard 2/3 pack sets. This lever allows you to remove or install any kind of tire with ease. Crank brothers even has a video that shows how simple the Speedier lever is to use!

-Standard Patch Kit
Vulcanizing patch kits do require a little more time and patience to use, but they do a better job of sealing off holes. You can also utilize the sealant to mend not only tubes, but tire gashes as well.

-Park Chain Tool
Chain tools seem to be one of those items where it’s really worth investing in a nice one. I’m pretty sure we’ve killed 3 chain tools before wising up and buying our trusty Park Tool one. You never know what will happen on a long ride. If your derailleur fails or something happens with your chain, you want to have the option to rock your bike singlespeed to get you home or to have the option to fix it if possible.

-Extra chain linksWhen you get a new chain on your bike, there’s usually going to be some extra links. Manufacturers tend to sell chains with excess links rather than not enough. If you take your bike into a shop, ask them to hold on to the extras in case you need to do a roadside repair. Use your chain tool to push out the link pin most of the way and connect in the new links if needed!

-Fix It sticks
The Fix It sticks have replaced two tools that used to be carried. One was a full on hex set and the other was a Swiss army knife with a couple of screw heads. This particular set of sticks has the correct size allen heads and flat head to make adjustments to our bikes. There are various options for heads depending on what your needs are. They have come in quite handy this summer!

-Chamois Cream
Having extra chamois cream around is great. Sometimes you don’t expect to go for a long ride or your friend may have forgotten theirs at home. We’ve used Hoo Ha for years and love it. We’ve used it as an anti-chafe cream for running, for the bra line area, used after long hikes where there was pant rub, and of course on long bike rides. This particular cream smells nice and has good healing properties. It’s also parabin free for those who don’t want sketchy ingredients in/on their bodies.

-Bike Tube
Patch kits are somewhat of a last resort in our camp as we like carrying an extra tube. Of course if we get multiple flats or two flats at once, the patch kits come in handy. The general rule of thumb we like to advise is, carry a tube that is either a little smaller width wise for your tire or the exact recommended size. You can always use a 23-25mm tube for a 28-32mm tire, but you can’t really use a 35mm width tube on a 28mm tire. Get what we’re saying? (feel free to ask questions)

That’s all for this edition of “What’s in Your Seat Bag?”. We’ll continue these posts with some less essential recommendations. There are different items for different types of riding and situations that can come up. Feel free to share with us your photos and recommendations for what to carry on the road!

SIDE BAR: Many folks would say- what? no pump. We do generally carry a pump, but we view this more as if you were stranded with other cyclists or out on the road…this is the bare minimum of what you would need to get going. That’s assuming there is air nearby. A presta to schrader valve converter is also a handy item to have as well. If you don’t know what that is, Google it or ask your local shop. We forgot to include that in the photo!