Soma Double Cross Updated Build!

Anyone who has followed this blog has seen the various iterations of my Soma Double Cross. I posted about the very first build and wanted to share the updates I’ve made to it within the last year.

I retired my bar top shifters and upgraded from a more touring based 3×9 setup to a more modern 1×10 drive train to drop some weight and make the bike a little more simple.

Here’s the current list of components featured in my video above!

My custom build is as follows:

Soma Double Cross Frame & Matching Fork Size 48cm
(I’m 5′ 5″ for sizing reference)

Handlebars: Nitto Noodle 40cm
Stem: Dimension 80 or 90mm
Headset: Tange Seiki Annodized Purple
Stem Cap: Kustom Caps
Front Rack: Nitto M18 with long strut kit
Rack Bag: Lone Peak Micro Rack Pack
Seatpost: Ritchey Classic 27.2
Seatpost Clamp: Salsa Lip Lock Anodized Purple
Saddle: Ergon SR Women’s Road
Fork light mount: Paul Components
Bar Tape: Lizard Skins DSP
Brifters: Sram Apex 10spd
Cable housing: Jagwire Cables Road Kit in Silver
Cables: Shimano/Sram aka whatever was in my parts bin
Brakes: Tektro CR720
Rear Derailleur: Sram GX 10 speed
Cassette: Sram GG1070 11-36t
Chain: Sram PC1071 10 speed
Crank: Sram Apex 42t Wide Narrow
BB: Sram GXP
Wheels: Suzue Road Wheelset
Skewers: Salsa Flip Off Purple Anodized
Tires: Compass/Rene Herse Barlow Pass 700x38c Tan Light Casing
Tubes: Vittoria Latex
Rear Rack: MSW Porkchop
Panniers: Axiom Monsoon (discontinued model)
Tail light bracket/light: NiteRider Sabre 80 USB rechargeable

Fix-A-Flat Video Series Part 1

Leading up to this Spring it’s been very busy for me. The shop I work for invested in many marketing projects, preparing for a large Spring sale, doing purchasing to get our store fully stocked for the Spring/Summer rush, and staying busy with a full repair load.

Then COVID19 hit. Oddly enough our shop has remained busy with us offering pick up/drop off repairs and we’ve been selling bikes, but it means we had to cancel all in store events.

I’m no stranger to teaching fix-a-flat clinics and had a few on the calendar for the Spring. We wanted a way to still engage with our customers, so I took it upon myself to start a filming project, starting with a fix-a-flat series to be able to share with our customers and their friends!

All of the content included in our videos is what I go over in my clinics. Please feel free to like, share subscribe, and I’m looking for content suggestions as well!

Have a burning question about something related to cycling? Looking for some video content to cover a technical repair question? Please share!

You can DM me via Instagram: @spokehaven or shoot me an e-mail: info@spokehaven.com to share your ideas.

Thanks to everyone who has viewed the video thus far and provided some great feedback. It’s appreciated!

Go wash your hands, keep your distance, ride solo, ride a trainer, tip your bike shop employees well, buy a gift card from a shop, and stay safe!

Good health to you all!

Cassandra

Planet Bike Rojo 100 Tail Light First Look

Planet Bike is synonymous with bike lights. If you live in the Midwest and ride, you’ve very likely owned at least one Planet Bike (PB) product, if not several like myself.

In all honesty I had moved away from using many of their products due to the changes in the landscape when it came to light offerings. Companies like Light & Motion and NiteRider were coming out with USB rechargeable lights that could handle extreme weather. You could also drop them and not have them explode into a mash up of plastic and batteries on the bike path.

My experience with PB had primarily been with their inexpensive, battery powered lights that were often very disposable due to the fact that most didn’t last a season. They either ate through batteries like crazy, broke if dropped, would die if the weather got too cold, or succumb to some other awful fate. (Usually getting nicked off my bike when parked downtown.)

To be fair, they had other products that weren’t as disposable. Their full coverage fenders and their ECO racks can still be seen on many bikes commuting across Madison.

At some point I noticed Planet Bike was playing catch up. They started coming out with newly designed lights that competed with some of the other light players in the industry. They had a line up of USB rechargeable head an tail lights.

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Rated for day and night time use.

Many of their lights use the same name, but have been upgraded with better casings and more power. The Blaze, Beamer, Spok, and Superflash have existed in multiple iterations.

It’s been a number of years since I have used a Planet Bike light, so I was happy when I showed up to work and saw the Rojo 100 sitting on my desk. Per my perusing on social media, I had seen that Planet Bike was sending samples of this light to lots of bikey influencers and shops alike to try them out.

I think Planet Bike is trying to regain their space in the lighting world by sharing new product and showing that they can compete on price/lumens and features.

My initial thoughts on the Rojo is that it looks like a Planet Bike light. It has a full plastic casing around it, with it’s traditional rear clip on the back. The nice thing is that I didn’t feel like I could pop the top cover off. I have not done a drop test with it yet to see how it survives. I’d like to ride with it for a bit before beating up too much.

There were a few things I noticed that I think gives PB an edge over the competition. The first being the amount of mounting brackets included in the packaging. There’s the traditional seat-post mount, a rear rack bracket to slide on the light, and a rear chain stay mount as well. Many brands often include one mount option and you have to purchase additional mounts, that is if there even is one. They also offer two additional stretchy strap style mounts that are sold separately. If you can’t find a way to mount this light to your bike, then I don’t know what to tell you!

The second thing I noticed is they ditched the micro USB charging for a USB-C! Yes! U-S-B-C. Why is it taking so many companies so long to adopt USB-C? Honestly I love it and had an Android phone that used USB-C before I made the switch back to iPhone and it was one of the best features. The plug is beefier, the hole is uniform so no having to squint and flip the cable over and over to make sure it’s positioned the right way, the charging is much faster, and it’s just oh so awesome. Kudos Planet Bike, whoever on your team got on board with USB-C is my new friend.

The third thing that I really like about the light is it has a TON of different mode options. I particularly like the courtesy mode, for those who want to have a blinking light option in a group ride or bike path setting. It’s not seizure inducing flicker that blinds you. It’s a very slow pulse with the light getting slowly brighter before blinking to the smaller under light. Here’s a video the company did to showcase the modes:

Now it’s not all butterflies and rainbows. I do have some reservations about the longevity of the light. For one it is made fully out of plastic, casing and all. Traditionally that usually signifies inexpensive and disposable in the world of bike lights. I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt on this though as I have other lights that also have full plastic casings that have lasted a fairly long time.

Another reservation is that while it’s listed as the Rojo 100, the steady lumen listing on this light is only 25 lumens. It’s only when you use the Pulse or Turbo modes that you actually make use of all 100 lumens. As a fan of using just a steady red rear light on my bike, I’d prefer to have a brighter steady lumen output. Particularly for when I’m riding on the road with cars. If I’m riding on a protected path, it’s not that big of a deal to me. I just prefer steady light as it can be distracting to drivers and riders around me to have something flashing. Personal preference, everyone is different.

The lumen count is also questionable on many bike lights. The brightness and directional visual output can vary greatly from brand to brand. Some brands actually get their lights tested and certified to a standard like ANSI (look it up if you aren’t familiar) in order to ensure their lumen count is accurate. I wasn’t able to see anything listed on the product page for the Rojo 100 on Planet Bike’s website, but I see they use CREE LED’s, which are a trusted leader in LED lighting.

The light is rated IP66 which is better than some of the competing lights on the market and worse than others. The $35 price point tail light is a tough market to compete in. You can purchase an 80 Lumen NiteRider Sabre, so a brighter light offering which offers a full 80 lumens on steady. You can also purchase the Blackburn Dayblazer 65 which offers a 50 lumen steady, 65 max lumen on high flash, has ANSI certification, and is IP67 rated. The difference between IP66 and IP67 is the ability of submerge the actual item that is rated vs. being able to withstand a jet of water.

The Rojo 100 has a lot of competition, but I think for folks who have liked and used Planet Bike’s lights and other products in the past that this would be a great upgrade to a more modernized light.

Planet Bike’s headquarters is based here in Madison, WI and they participate in 1% for the Planet. They donate a lot of time, energy, money, and product to our local cycling community. So there’s something to supporting the homegrown company.

While I have not run this light through testing as of yet, I’d still say that it’s a good contender if you need to upgrade to a USB rechargeable option or need a spare for a 2nd or 3rd bike. The mounting options alone are a killer bargain for the $35 price point. I can confirm that most lights in that price bracket don’t offer that many accessories.

If you’d like to purchase the Planet Bike Rojo 100 please hit up your local bike shop OR you can order directly from Planet Bike’s website.

Thanks for reading as always and I look forward to putting the Rojo 100 to the test!
Thank you to Jereme and the crew over at Planet Bike for continuing to evolve their products and being such a driving force for our local cycling community.

Disclosure:
I received this product free of charge, but was not contacted by anyone at Planet Bike to write a review for this product, nor did my employer ask me to write this for any sort of financial game. Currently my home shop does not actively stock Planet Bike’s lights, but we do stock other products from their line.

If you like this and other content please feel free to follow Spoke Haven on Instagram @SpokeHaven or on Facebook.com/spokehaven

Spoke Haven is also on YouTube.com/spokehaven

 

Liv Macha Pro Shoes Video Review

I waited quite awhile for these beauties to arrive while I was a Liv ambassador. Once I finally received them and got some road pedals, they completely changed my thoughts on road cycling specific clip-less pedals.

I’ve always viewed road pedals and shoes as an inconvenience. You have to carry cleat covers to walk around a coffee shop or pub during or after a ride. You have think more about clipping in and getting in and out of the pedal.

After having done some road specific rides with these shoes and Giant’s Road Elite pedals paired with the Liv Mach Pro shoes, I’ve seen the light. I’ve noticed increased power on the bike. The shoes are super light and comfortable with a great stiff carbon EXO sole.

I don’t mind tossing some cleat covers in my saddle bag or jersey pocket IF I’m going to be stopping on a ride. I have been trying to force myself to just stick to strictly fast road rides on my road bike so as to take advantage of my set up. In addition to new pedals and shoes, I also upgraded my tires to the Continental GP5000. An amazing upgrade from the stock Giant Gavia’s on my bike and of course they are set up tubeless. More to come on tubeless in another post.

After a number of months of using the shoes I can say I 100% recommend them. I plan on using them for when I eventually get around to setting up my trainer and rocking some Zwift.

I realize the write-up itself is very short and sweet, but I cover the shoes pretty in depth in my video review, so please check it out!

As I disclose in the video, I was a Liv Ambassador for two years. I did receive these shoes free of charge from Liv as a part of my ambassador kit. I am no longer an ambassador of Liv and wasn’t not encouraged, paid, or have any direct monetary benefit for my review.

I am employed by a Liv and Giant dealer, but do not make commission off of any sales of their products.

Should you like this content, please keep up to date by following me @spokehaven on IG. I also post fitness and nutrition content on @twowheelfitness.

Please also like, subscribe, comment, etc. on YouTube. Thanks for reading and stay tuned for more gear reviews, write up, travel, and MORE!

#eatwellbikeoften

 

Winter Powered by Krampus

krampusbw
Snow Krampus

It’s been awhile and we realize that. Much apologies to anyone who has followed the blog. With lack of a good working computer and living with just a tablet and smartphone, blogging hasn’t been the easiest thing to accomplish. Never fear, there’s much to cover and be discussed now that the Spoke Haven’s tech  is now up and running again.

There are some new bikes in the lineup as of late 2016 and early 2017 and I can’t wait to share them all with you!

The first bike to join the stable was a Surly Krampus. The Krampus has been around for a few years. It’s what is classified as a mid-fat bike or plus sized bike. It has a 3″ wide tire spec’d on it. Surly has updated the Krampus for the 2017 model year with their knot boost spacing, the ability to add an internally routed dropper post, and a few other bells and whistles. Check Surly’s website for current spec’s.

krampusnew
Stock Surly

I went for what is now referred to as a legacy Krampus. The bass boat green color cannot be beat. It’s probably one of my favorite Surly colors of all time. The bike just sparkles in the sunlight. So much so that I named my small sized Krampus Swampy Sparkles.
Before I delve into the overview, I want give a little history on Surly as a brand.
Surly has brought fat and plus sized riding to the mainstream.  When the Surly Pugsley landed on the market, it was not soon after that we saw a plethora of fat bike offerings from bike companies big and small. Each one trying to capture this new wave of people who wanted to extend their riding seasons and be able to ride in places never thought possible. OmniTerra is the term Surly uses to describe their category of fat and plus sized bikes.

krampusheadbadge
Headtube Glitter

Now, Surly admits to not being the first company to use the fat tire or plus sized platform. That being said, they have been able to push the cycling industry forward with creating bikes that are accessible and relatively affordable. Being a part of the Quality Bike Parts (QBP) family definitely makes sourcing a bit easier and a little more affordable.

I have personally ridden damn near every iteration of a Surly fat or plus bike they have ever made. Notice I said I have ridden, not owned. I don’t have a money tree growing outside of my front door! The exception being the new 27.5+ Karate Monkey. I admit that if I ride that bike, I may want to ride that over my Krampus. Maybe not though. Although the Prince purple version of that bike tempts me every time I see it. *drool*

surly-karate-monkey-ss-sv-17-930x390
Photo from Surly’s Website- Karate Monkey

The Krampus is more nimble feeling than a traditional 4-5″ tired fat bike. It holds its own on groomed snow as well as on icy bike paths. With the name like Krampus, it’s surprisingly not marketed much as a snow bike. Rather, Surly deems it as a trail bike. Something you can do a great deal of exploring on, but it excels on dirt and loose rocky, rooty goodness.

That’s not to say the Krampus can’t be a fantastic off-road touring rig or a bike to use for snow riding. It just excels more at being a trail ripper that inspires confident riding. For those of you who are looking for a dedicated dirt tourer from Surly, check out the ECR. The ECR is on the same 29+, three inch tire platform- just different geometry and more mounts on the bike for attaching gear.

ecr-14_sv_930x390
Photo from Surly’s website- ECR

Out of the box the Krampus had some great things going for it. Shimano SLX and Deore components, a 1x drive train, mechanical BB7 brakes, beautiful paint, and a no-nonsense cockpit. I am usually one for taking a bike and pulling most stock parts off of it. I didn’t do much of that this time around. I didn’t feel the need to, as the bike was extremely functional and well performing.

I did swap out the stock chain ring for a wide-narrow option from Race Face. I also added some fun orange anodized headset spacers from Wolftooth components. I chopped about an inch and a half of handlebar off each side and slid on some Ergon grips. My friend’s over at Green River Cyclery in Auburn, WA hooked me up with the sickest decals ever. Some fun purple bar ends I had laying around, a set of Giant platform pedals and I was ready to go!

30386353702_3768572ecd_o
A little bit of bling.

As an intermediate level mountain biker, the Krampus got me out of some riding situations I would that would have previously been either too sketchy or a death march on my fat bike. The width of the tires and the extremely low pressure they are able to run makes up for not having suspension on the front fork. They also provide amazing grip on even the greasiest of trails.

I have been also able to climb up some pretty technical, rocky ascents with the Krampus without hesitation. It has been a boost of confidence and allowed me to feel more comfortable riding more technical terrain as I develop my riding skills.

Overall I have really enjoyed the bike and it’s provided me some really fun riding over the summer and this winter alike.

Now, it’s not all butterflies and unicorns with the Krampus. The bike is quite beastly. There are a couple of local climbs I have either had to walk up or stop and take a rest on because the bike can take quite a bit of huffing to get it up some steeps.

krampussnow
Getting Ready for Quarry Ridge! Photo by: Brenda Limpert

I do sometimes wish it came stock with hydraulic disc brakes in some situations, but I like mechanical brakes in a touring or bike packing situation where they are more field serviceable. It’s kind of a wash, but it may depend on what you plan on doing with the bike. I hope to use it more for off road touring and bike packing in 2017, as I have added a full suspension 27.5/650b bike to my stable. More on that in another post!

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Liv Pique 2 Sneak Peak! Photo: Vital MTB

Having the ability for a dropper post with internal routing would be nice, but that also adds weight. Same with adding a front suspension fork. All items being addressed on the current iteration of the Krampus. I personally don’t see adding a suspension fork to the bike anytime soon. There are quite a few folks out there in the blog world that have experimented with front suspension with some mixed reviews.

So far I haven’t had any real issues with the bike, other thank experimenting with chain length when I first built it. I ended up shoving the rear wheel as forward in the dropouts as possible and shortened the chain accordingly. I do sometimes get chain rub on the rear tire when in the largest rear cog on climbs, but it’s not enough to really make me pull the crank or cassette off to put in a spacer to address the issue.

krampusgarage
Snow Day!

Overall I am happy with the bike and look forward to having it being something I can beat on and not feel all that guilty about. There is nothing insanely expensive on it spec wise and everything is pretty dependable component wise. I look forward to experimenting with some different setups on it for bike packing. I see a Jones H bar in Swampy Sparkle’s future. A Jones bar and possible the Krampus/ECR fork with braze-ons to make gear hauling easier.  krampuspaint

If you are interested in checking out the Surly Krampus or any of Surly’s other bikes you can check out their Intergalactic Dealer Locator on their website. Almost all bike shops utilize QBP for ordering though, so you can pretty much source one from any shop in your area. I’ll be sure to post an update on the Krampus should it get a makeover, but for the time being it will be my outdoor winter bike, ready for the snow and slush!krampusseminole

Full disclosure: I was not paid by Surly to write a review for them. The bike was purchased via a shop discount through Fitchburg Cycles in Fitchburg, WI. All accessories added to the bike were also purchased by me and not paid for by any of the companies mentioned in the write up.